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Identity theft from online dating Stap on sex chat

Identity theft is nothing new, but it's on the rise.

Figures from the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) show a 33 per cent increase in reported cases in 2014 alone.

Also important is knowing the warning signs of potential scams once you start meeting people online.

“If someone is being impersonated on Tinder, they should contact Facebook's help centre to file a report, because it ultimately means that someone is impersonating them on Facebook,” says a spokeswoman.Be aware that if you comment on a public page - a business page or celebrity profile, for instance, - then, at a minimum, your profile picture and cover photo will be accessible.However, while this is all well and good, Dr Toogood points out that even if you take all the above precautions, your 'friends' also need to be stringent, in order to mitigate your risks and protect your social media assets “; If you appear in an image on a timeline of one of your friends, this may be public or expose you to those who are not on your accepted friends list,” she explains.“It is a frightening reality that you can have your private photos, and other information, used and distributed without your knowledge or permission.The security issues surrounding this type of identity theft can be wide ranging.” Fake profiles on Tinder may appear harmless.And while some social media sites have introduced methods to combat revenge porn - following a new law to criminalise it in England and Wales - it seems that, when it comes to identity theft, the burden of proof lies with the victim.Lana was told she had to identify the accounts before either social media platform would investigate.“Both Tinder and Facebook have said that I need to give provide the account information for the fraudulent profiles, but as Tinder only shows the first name and age on each profile, its basically impossible,” she says.So - as fake profiles on Tinder can be difficult to identify and the tech companies appear unwilling to help - is there anyway to ensure that your social media photos don’t fall into the hands of scammers?The same protection is not afforded to the victims of imposter online accounts.As a result, critics have said there is little incentive for the technology companies to target fraudsters who are illegally using the identities of its users, because their profits are unaffected.

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  1. When a fraudster used her Facebook photos to set up fake online dating accounts, Lana Price assumed that the websites would be prepared to help her stop.

  2. Looking for love online? Be careful-dating sites can be targets for credit card fraud. Follow these tips to find your true love and protect your identity!

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